Old Timey Mushroom Wreath

In my ongoing effort to expand my Christmas décor with non-Christmassy things, AND learn a thing or two about new Christmas traditions, I discovered that mushrooms are an ancient symbol of good luck in many  parts of the world. Get that? Mushrooms. They are not just for pizza anymore. I also happen to think mushrooms are super cute and stuff and will look good on my door all the way through February and beyond. Double stuff woot!
I had seen red and white toadstools used as a motif on ornaments and cards at German Christmas markets, but I did not know why. So I went a huntin’. This is some of the delightfully weird information I found:

  • The red and mushrooms, aka Amanita muscaria, aka fly agaric, aka Champignon, are known for being highly poisonous and for having psychedelic properties. Eaten fresh they could easily kill you, but dry them out all winter, and, well…
  • Amanitas are almost exclusively found growing at the base of coniferous trees. Because of their close proximity, ancient pagans used the dried Amanitas to adorn pine branches to celebrate winter solstice, a practice which later evolved into decorating Christmas trees. In other words, Amanitas were the first Christmas ornament. Who knew? 
  • The tradition of using green, red and white as designated Christmas colors comes from the evergreen tree and the red and white mushrooms underneath.
  • According to Wikipedia, Santa Claus’s red and white costume is inspired by Amanita mushrooms. Warning, this part gets a little weird; “The idea of Santa Claus and tradition of hanging stockings over the fireplace is based centrally upon the fly agaric mushroom itself. With its generally red and white color scheme, he argues that Santa Claus’s suit is related to the mushroom. He also draws parallels with flying reindeer: reindeer had been reported to consume the mushroom and prance around in an intoxicated manner afterwards.  American ethnopharmacologist Scott Hajicek-Dobberstein, researching possible links between religious myths and the red mushroom, notes, “If Santa Claus had but one eye [like Odin], or if magic urine had been a part of his legend, his connection to the Amanita muscaria would be much easier to believe.” Wow. Way to be weird, Wikipedia.
There are several books devoted to exploring the ties between ancient Christianity and mushrooms. I’m not buying any of them (literally), but it’s an interesting subject. You decide for yourself. In the meantime, I’m making a wreath!
This isn’t much of a tutorial. These little Styrofoam mushrooms came with stems on the bottom that made it easy to pierce them through a wreath base. After I painted a few of them red and white, I just stuck them in and added a little silicone adhesive to help with stability. That was about it. After it dried, I filled the gaps with some reindeer moss (how appropriate) from  the dollar store. Simple and abundant.  
Where did you get the mushrooms? Floral supply places will have them, or you can get them online. I got these on clearance from The Pottery when I was in Virginia last year. A year ago, if you were within 100 miles of Williamsburg I would tell you to make the trek to shop there, but as I understand, The Pottery recently moved and lost it’s friendly-craft-supply-warehouse-with-rock-bottom-prices way. This makes me sad. For many years, it was by far my all-time favorite craft store. Sad face. Does anyone else know of a beyond fabulous craft supply warehouse worth visiting? I might need to make a road trip.  

Comments

  1. Katie (Lemon Jitters) says

    PEACHES. Your crafting genius is amazing. I think am simultaneously jealous and in love with you. Thank you for continuing to be my favorite spot on the Internet!

  2. PeachesFreund says

    Good questions. I was just reading about the Sana elf thing this weekend. Apparently the elf tradition is Scandinavian…called Tomte I think. I’m not sure how close they are related to fairies, but I do know people eat cookies shaped like goats or something. The St. Nicolas thing is German. The Germans also have this tradition called Krampus, where I big black demon comes out and kidnaps all the bad kids in early December. I guess that was scary so they counter balanced the legend with the promise of something nice on St. Nicolas day by way of treats and presents. Then, in Eastern spain they get their presents by beating up a pooping log. Stella, you need to read this! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ti%C3%B3_de_Nadal

    I should write a series of posts on this stuff. It’s so weird!!!!

  3. Aubrey Tate says

    I’m not much for wreaths, don’t quite understand them, but boy oh boy do I totally get this one! Loooooove it! Very creative!

  4. says

    Love your mushroom wreath Aunt Peaches! We love it so much, I think the humom is going to try and find some of those mushrooms and actually make one!! BTW, Santa is a big Elf, right? And Elves are somehow related to fairies, right? And rings of mushrooms are sometimes called fairy rings…..hmmmmmm……

  5. says

    Oh Peaches.
    If you ever come to Canada, let me know. I will be your crafting depot four guide. I know the locals to get the cheapest everything, from dried flowers to empty snow globes to cosmetic glitter.
    And, if your one of those Americans, yes, we can ride on polar bears to the different craft supply igloos :) (just playing :)

  6. PeachesFreund says

    Haha! I have always wanted to ride a polar bear down the dried flower aisle. Seriously though- I have had a Canadian road trip on my bucket list for years. One of these summers I am going to do it for real. I will rely on your guidance!

  7. miznelliebellie says

    only you would create a wreath from mushrooms. and that it would look perfect!!! That’s why I love you!

  8. sarah says

    Fabulous wreath… odd yet interesting info about Mushrooms. Stockade.ca is a fabulous craft supply warehouse that, although not close to you, ships all across Canada and into the USA. Definitely worth a look: https://stockade.ca/default.asp (your new banner header inspired my homepage homage to glitter).

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